began taking steps to curb this waste and pollution back in 1992. They instituted tough new standards that required new furnaces to turn a minimum of 78 percent of its fuel into heat. Furnace manufacturers began making models that met and sometimes far surpassed that minimum standard. The Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency 熊孩子贪玩骗母亲 湖南宁乡特大洪灾

Home-and-Family If you have an older furnace (more than ten years old) you may need to replace it with an energy-efficient furnace. Doing so not only helps with keeping down the energy bill, but also helps the environment. With nearly 40 million American homes heated by natural gas- fired, forced-air heating systems- energy efficient furnaces are no longer a luxury. They are a necessity. Most older conventional forced-air furnaces operate at very low efficiencies— some taking advantage of only half the fuel they burn. They typically send more than 30 percent of their energy up the furnace flue. When they do that, they also pump nearly four tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere each month. This creates the greenhouse gas effect. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began taking steps to curb this waste and pollution back in 1992. They instituted tough new standards that required new furnaces to turn a minimum of 78 percent of its fuel into heat. Furnace manufacturers began making models that met and sometimes far surpassed that minimum standard. The Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE) rating is now posted on all furnaces. This is the yellow "Energy Guide" label found on the units. They must be at least at a 78 percent, and some go up to as high as nearly 97 percent. Furnaces above 90 percent are given a "high efficiency" rating. Those between 78 percent and 90 percent are given a "mid efficiency" rating. When you are replacing your old furnace, keep these ratings in mind. Many furnace manufacturers will list their units as "high efficiency" when in reality they fall into the "mid efficiency" range. High efficiency models can cost $500 to $1500 more than the mid efficiency units. The payback period has some variables. It depends on the price of the system and local energy costs and climate. The difference in efficiency between the old and new furnaces should also be considered. Generally speaking, if you can afford the extra for the high efficiency model you should go that route. To help with comparisons, the Yellow Energy Guides list estimate annual operating costs. These are based on specific conditions for the furnace. It’s a good idea to ask your dealer to help you determine what the actual payback and savings can be. Tim Swan of Swan Heating and Air Conditioning in Fort Collins, CO says that a good HVAC company will offer a wide range of heating products and services to meet most needs. You should be wary of a company that tries to force one specific kind of unit on you. More than solution should be offered. In the long run, a high efficiency furnace can save you money. If you’re in need of a furnace replacement you should consider getting the best unit you can afford. At the very least, locate a great HVAC company you can trust, and make sure your present furnace is being serviced properly and is safe. About the Author: 相关的主题文章: